KCTV 5 Popular Stories

Independence police investigating fatal vehicle collision

INDEPENDENCE, MO (KCTV) – Police are investigating a fatal vehicle collision Tuesday evening.

Independence police were called to the area of R.D. Mize and Maybrook just before 6 p.m.

Officers said an eastbound Chevrolet pickup truck left the roadway and traveled through a yard and privacy fence then struck a tree.

The driver and sole occupant was transported by ambulance to a local hospital where he later died. The identity of the deceased will be released after family members have been notified.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

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Police investigating suspicious item at KCI

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) – Police are investigating a suspicious item at KCI Tuesday evening.

The Kansas City International Airport posted a tweet around 6:20 p.m. stating that police are investigating a suspicious item and have closed the roadway that accesses Terminal C.

ALERT: Police are investing a suspicious item and have closed the roadway that accesses Terminal C. 6:17pm&mdash; Kansas City International Airport (@KCIAirport) <a href="https://twitter.com/KCIAirport/status/1308546005630099456?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 22, 2020</a>

This is a developing story. Stay with KCTV5 News for updates.

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COVID-19 test promises faster results

COVID-19 test promises faster results

OVERLAND PARK, KS (KCTV) - A new option for coronavirus testing is promising even faster results. KCTV5 News explains how it works and what doctors think of the test.

Health Gauge, out of Iowa, does COVID-19 testing a little bit different from what you may be used to. Everything is done right at your car, from the paperwork, to the actual testing.

“We just need a wet swab,” Health Gauge President Scott McGlothlen said.

Once that’s done, you’re on your way with results coming back to you in less than an hour.

“Convenient so we have a law firm about a mile from here and this testing is in and out,” Michael Matteuzzi who had the test done said.

Convenience is what the group was hoping to provide.

“There is now an affordable convenient less invasive option where you can get results in an hour same day appointments without qualifications and these tests are extremely accurate,” McGlothlen said.

But KCTV5 News wanted to know whether medical officials agree with rapid testing like this.

“I think these testing methods can be done in a variety of situations whether it is in a current cluster outbreak situation or whether it is if you are symptomatic and what a rapid answer to if you have the test or not travel, all of these sorts of situations,” Dr. Dana Hawkinson with The University of Kansas Health System said.

Dr. Hawkinson says that the PCR test, which involves the swabbing deeper in the nose, is the gold standard.

“With the PCR test the molecular test there’s no false positives if they say that that you have the virus you have the virus,” McGlothlen said.

But Health Gauge’s test is very close in accuracy at 96.7%, which is why medical officials say those tests are good to use.

“At this point in time you would still want to possibly follow up a negative test with a PCR test especially if you are having symptoms,” Dr. Hawkinson said.

Health Gauge currently has one location at Oak Park Mall in Overland Park. The hope is to create more location around the Kansas City metro.

If you’re interested in getting tested, you can sign up for an appointment on their <a href="https://hgscreenings.com/covid19-testing" target="_blank">website</a>.

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Lawsuit challenges mail-in voting in Missouri for some

Lawsuit challenges mail-in voting in Missouri for some

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) - People lined up Tuesday in Kansas City to cast the first votes in Missouri for the 2020 presidential election. But a lawsuit is challenging the way Missouri has set up for some citizens to vote by mail.

Hundreds of people have flocked to Union Station throughout the day. That lawsuit, which was filed on Friday, basically accuses the secretary of state of coming up with rules that are about as clear as mud. They say that confusion could cost some their vote.

“It was very smooth. Everybody was so helpful. Got it set up and it was like, very nice,” voter John Paul Redd said.

But it wasn’t without its’ glitches. Glenda Howell has voted in every election now for years and says her name wasn’t on the list. Once that was cleared up, she says she found out that at least for Tuesday, there were no paper ballots.

“That was a thing that kind of concerned me because you know, I’m thinking about, OK it’s going to get hacked, manipulated or something of that nature,” Howell said.

Kansas City Election Board Democratic Board Director Lauri Ealom says voters will have paper ballots. They just didn’t Tuesday, and she wants to be sure Howell and others know their votes are safe.

“Any Missouri resident may request a mail-in ballot, first time it’s ever been allowed in the state of Missouri. Please, it can be confusing,” Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft said.

From the polls to mail-in voting, several organizations aren’t feeling so confident and filed a lawsuit against Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft accusing the state of confusion when it comes to mail-in and absentee ballots leaving some feeling disenfranchised.

The suit claims some first-time voters, older voters and people of color experienced frustration during the August primaries and many of them did not have their votes counted. They’re asking for the process to be more streamlined.

Secretary Ashcroft says he finds it “weird” a lawsuit would be filed for offering the public another voting alternative during a pandemic.

“We’ve had three successful elections where if you were registered you could vote and we’re gonna have a fourth one like that and we’re not gonna let a frivolous lawsuit stop that,” Secretary Ashcroft said.

Secretary Ashcroft strongly urges all voters to be familiar with mail-in and absentee ballots. What the differences are and how to vote using those alternatives. He encourages everyone who can to vote in person.

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Police investigating after dead body found in area of 18th and Bristol

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) – Police are investigating a deceased body that was found Tuesday afternoon.

The Kansas City Police Department was called to the area of 18th and Bristol on a reported dead body just before 1 p.m.

A citizen directed police to a wooded area nearby where they found an unknown adult male deceased and in the advanced stages of decomposition.

Detectives will be canvassing the area for any information.

Anyone with information is asked to call the homicide unit directly at 816-234-5043 or the anonymous TIPS hotline at 816-474-TIPS (8477).

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KC Mayor Quinton Lucas takes over as Chair of Transportation Committee

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) – Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas is taking over as temporary chair of the committee in charge of building the new KCI airport.

Several members of the Transportation Committee have accused the previous chair Teresa Loar of racist behavior and boycotted the last meeting.

Mayor Lucas says it's essential to keep the committee on track, especially on overseeing the construction of the new airport terminal.

He plans to introduce a number of changes aimed at making the committee operate more fairly and smoothly.

Mayor Lucas announces membership update to the Transportation, Infrastructure, and Operations Committee: <a href="https://t.co/pi7I6UYJos">pic.twitter.com/pi7I6UYJos</a>&mdash; Mayor Quinton Lucas (@MayorLucasKC) <a href="https://twitter.com/MayorLucasKC/status/1308457876114083840?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 22, 2020</a>

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Kansas City community asks for answers in shooting death of child from Monday

Kansas City community asks for answers in shooting death of child from Monday

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) - An outpouring of outrage and sorrow following the shooting death of 1-year-old Tyron Payton. It happened Monday near 33rd and South Benton. Police say someone walked up firing into a car with the little boy and his parents inside. The family then drove to a local fire station to get help.

Pastors and antiviolence groups from across the city gathered Tuesday to hand out fliers asking for information. There's a $25,000 reward for information leading to an arrest. But in a historically violent year in Kansas City, they're also angry.

“This happened in the middle of the day,” resident Ron Hunt said.

“It seems like every month we have a baby losing their life,” Bishop Tony Caldwell said.

“We have to stand up and say enough is enough,” resident Desmound Logan said.

“Kansas City has to do better,” Pastor Emanuel Cleaver III said.

“It shouldn't take the death of a small child for us to come together,” resident Marquita Taylor said.

“This little boy will have the full power of the community and the full power of KCPD. We're coming after you and we're going to get you,” Deputy Chief Karl Oakman said.

Firefighters from the firehouse at 32nd and Indiana where the family went for help joined them to say this needs to stop.

Zachary Fatall is a firefighter at the station. When the family pulled into the station, it didn't take long for him to realize what had just happened.

“You could tell there was bullet holes in the car. The man in the passenger seat had blood all over him. I knew what was going on,” Fatall said. “We did everything we could to stop the bleeding and get him to the hospital as fast as we could.”

1-year-old Payton didn't make it. For first responders, it's part of a harsh everyday reality.

“If I let it eat away at me there's no way I'd survive doing this job,” Fatall said.

It's also not the first time Kansas City fire stations have been impacted by gun violence.

“This year so far we've had three different fire stations shot up,” Kansas City Fire Department Chief Jimmy Walker said.

Chief Walker says it's frustrating for the men and women who put their lives on the line every day.

“This is our home too. We're invested in this neighborhood and invested in making it better,” Chief Walker said.

To them, it's time to act for the good of the community they serve.

“It's terrible. I hope it changes. But until there's massive policy change, it's not gonna,” Fatall said.

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Man accused of killing 4-year-old LeGend Taliferro pleads not guilty

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -- The man charged with murder in the shooting death of Kansas City four-year-old LeGend Taliferro pleaded "not guilty" at his arraignment Tuesday morning in Jackson County.

Ryson Ellis, 22, remains in the Jackson County Detention Center without bond. He is charged with second-degree murder, unlawful use of a weapon and two counts of armed criminal action.

Ellis appeared via video in front of a judge at Jackson County Courthouse for his arraignment, which is common when the defendant remains in jail. A preliminary hearing in the case is set for Oct. 13 at 9 a.m.

"Not guilty" pleas are standard during arraignments, as they allow the legal process to move forward. A "not guilty" plea does not preclude the possibility of a plea bargain later in the case.

Ellis is accused of firing the shots that killed young LeGend while he slept in his bed at the Citadel Apartments on Bushman Drive the morning of June 29. Someone had fired gunshots into an apartment from an area behind it, shooting through a privacy fence and a sliding glass door.

A witness told police that the suspect had a “fade cut” and facial hair on the chin. This generally matches the description of Ellis.

Court records also say that a woman was in the apartment at the time of the shooting. She told police she had a son with Ellis and he had assaulted her a few days before the shooting. The witness later received threatening social media messages from Ellis.

The assault caused members of her family to confront him. One of the family members is Taliferro’s father and he lived at the apartment where the 4-year-old was later shot.

A suspect vehicle was captured on surveillance video the night of the shooting. Police determined it was a rental vehicle. Rental car records confirmed it was rented on June 23 and not returned until July 3.

A witness stated she drove the vehicle the night of the fatal shooting that Ellis got out of the vehicle near that apartment. She then heard gunshots and Ellis came running back to the car.

She said she didn’t find out until later someone had been killed.

Prosecutors requested Ellis be held without bond.

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas posted on Twitter after the charges were announced and said: "While my heart continues to break for LeGend’s family, I am thankful that today an important step towards justice has been taken. Thank you for the hard investigative work of the women and men of law enforcement and the prosecutors with a heavy task ahead."

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Good Question: Is all of this online learning going to impact my child’s eyesight?

Good Question: Is all of this online learning going to impact my child’s eyesight?

Schools and families have come a long way since March, in terms of online learning. But, now that we're spending even more time with our faces in various screens, more problems are popping up.

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Police: Pedestrian dead after hit and run near 57th and Swope Parkway

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) – A 45-year-old Kansas City man is dead after a hit and run Monday evening.

Kansas City police were called to 57th and Swope Parkway for a fatal collision involving a pedestrian just before 8:30 p.m.

Officers said the man had been walking across the northbound lanes of traffic when he was struck by a vehicle that left the scene. Witnesses described the vehicle as a dark SUV or crossover.

The vehicle had reportedly been traveling at high speeds when the collision occurred and was last seen northbound.

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US coronavirus cases surpass 7 million with more than 204,000 deaths

US coronavirus cases surpass 7 million with more than 204,000 deaths

(Meredith) -- Cases of the novel coronavirus in the United States have surpassed 7 million with more than 204,000 deaths.

According to <a href="https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/" target="_blank">Worldometer</a>, as of Monday, there are 7,046,216 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. According to the same chart, 204,506 people have died from the virus in the U.S. and 4,299,525 have recovered so far.

The U.S. has a population of about 327,200,000, which means about 2.1% of the country has been infected and tested positive. Because of the unknown number of people who may have had the virus and were asymptomatic or were not tested, that number could be higher.

According to these numbers, the mortality rate of positive COVID-19 cases in the U.S. stands at 2.9% (204,506 deaths out of 7,046,216 positive cases), equal to about 1 in 32 people . The positive case number includes active cases that have not yet had an outcome (recovery or death).

Because of the unknown number of people who may have had the virus and were asymptomatic or were not tested, the case fatality rate could be lower. The case fatality rate of COVID-19 is based on the number of positive, known cases.

Of the 7,046,216 infections, California accounts for about 11.3% of the cases with 786,411. The state with the next most cases is Texas with 721,968.

<a href="https://www.news.meredithlmg.com/tncms/asset/editorial/b5d02f36-8e3a-11ea-a473-5b579b03fa6d">FACT CHECK: No, the CDC did not cut its COVID-19 death toll numbers in half, and here's why</a>

Worldometer's COVID-19 data is trusted and used by Johns Hopkins CSSE, Financial Times, The New York Times, Business Insider, and many others.

The country's first coronavirus case was reported January 20 in Washington state. On March 26, the U.S. became the country with the highest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the world when cases topped 82,000, surpassing Italy and China, both of which were previous epicenters of the pandemic.

In March, U.S. health officials predicted the number of cases, deaths and hospitalizations would peak on Easter Sunday, April 12. According to <a href="https://covid19.healthdata.org/united-states-of-america" target="_blank">data from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation</a> (IHME), it appears COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. peaked on Thursday, April 16 with 2,272 deaths.

On March 31, President Donald Trump warned of a "painful" and "tough" stretch ahead as he extended nationwide distancing measures that -- even if followed closely -- could still mean more than 100,000 and up to 240,000 Americans die from coronavirus. On April 8, death toll projections lowered significantly, with officials then guessing that around 60,000 Americans would die from the virus by August. Then, on May 1, predictions increased again, with the IHME predicting about 72,400 Americans would die from the virus by August. Now, predictions have increased yet again back to the original high projection. As of Sept. 7, the IHME <a href="https://covid19.healthdata.org/united-states-of-america" target="_blank">now predicts</a> that about 410,000 Americans will die of COVID-19 by Jan. 1.

Worldwide coronavirus deaths have reached 969,298 with more than 31.4 million reported cases.

As of Monday, the top five countries with the most COVID-19 cases are:

United States – 7,046,216India – 5,560,105Brazil – 4,560,083Russia - 1,109,595Colombia - 772,896

China, where the virus originated, is number 43 on the list with 85,297 cases.

You can track coronavirus cases on Worldometer <a href="https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/" target="_blank">here</a>, which is updated every few minutes. You can also track U.S. cases on the CDC's website <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/cases-in-us.html" target="_blank">here</a>.

For more information on COVID-19, you can visit the CDC's <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html" target="_blank">website</a>.

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CDC deletes COVID-19 changes saying information was inadvertently released before it was time

FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) - A new report on the CDC’s website over the weekend warned the coronavirus spreads easier than we thought. Monday morning, the CDC pulled back on that saying the information was inadvertently released before it was time.

As the US approaches 200,000 deaths from the coronavirus, most of us are reading up as much as we can on the latest information. On Friday, the CDC warned the virus may be more easily transmitted than we originally thought through aerosol particles, many of which linger in the air much longer than we thought. An update was posted by the CDC website that left some people confused and others frustrated.

Rani Waugh works in a medical lab and says the CDC reversal of information to a public already confused by the unknowns of the pandemic is troubling.

“My concern is how much of what the CDC is putting out there is being politically influenced, because we’re flip-flopping on a lot of stuff here,” Waugh said.

In its Friday post, the CDC agreed with what many scientists and doctors have been saying now for months, that the virus can spread through aerosol particles. Smaller than droplets, these particles may linger, longer.

The CDC used restaurants, fitness classes and choir practices as examples and recommended the use of air purifiers. But Monday morning, the post included an update, one that warned its previous post was an error.

Sarah Boyd is an infectious disease doctor at St. Luke’s Health System and says we can still take new information and incorporate it with what we already do know. After all, information is constantly changing.

“I think they were trying to really have us begin to think about the space between others and the activity that we’re doing and kind of adjust for ourselves,” Dr. Boyd said.

Dr. Boyd recommends wearing your mask, practice as much social distancing as you can and wash your hands. Just do your part with all the information you have to keep you and everyone around you safe and healthy.

“If they can look at it as an opportunity to learn about the science and figure out how that works into their daily life, we’ll all be better for it,” Dr. Boyd said.

As for masks in general, Dr. Boyd says make sure it fits to your face and as always, any mask is better than no mask.

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Man who was in car at time of triple shooting shares what he remembers

Man who was in car at time of triple shooting shares what he remembers

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) – In the aftermath of the shooting at 33rd and Benton, as neighbors grieved the loss of a child and police marked off dozens of shell casings, a man known only as Jose shared his story asking that we not show his face or use his real name.

“All I remember is that they started shooting. They must have come straight at us. It was just pop, pop, pop,” Jose said.

Jose was in the backseat of the car that was hit with his two friends and their son who is a toddler. He doesn't know why another car targeted the family.

“I remember when they started shooting, it was a pain right here in my right side,” Jose said.

That pain turned out to be from broken glass. Somehow the gunshots missed him, he says he blacked out as his friend drove to the nearby fire station for help. He knows his two friends were badly hurt and that their son didn't make it.

“I'm thinking, 'man, who the hell would do this,’ you know? Maybe someone was after them. I got checked," Jose said.

Jose is from the Chicago area, another place where violent crime has surged in 2020. Like many, he's had enough.

“In Chicago, they're doing the same thing. They're shooting two-year olds, three-year olds. It's sad,” Jose said.

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Local produce farmer hopes to grow his business in a different way

Local produce farmer hopes to grow his business in a different way

With very few kids in class right now, school lunches aren't going out to as many students and the ripple effect is hurting some businesses.

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Gov. Kelly concerned about state's response to coronavirus

LIBERTY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly said Monday she is increasingly concerned the state does not have the infrastructure and policies in place to stop a continuing increase in confirmed cases of the coronavirus

On Monday, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported 53,959 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 600 deaths since the pandemic began. That’s an increase of 1,674 cases and four deaths over the weekend.

The governor said the state has consistently confirmed an average of about 500 new cases per day in the recent weeks, particularly as schools are reopening, sports have resumed and flu season is quickly approaching.

“We knew this was coming, we knew we could prepare for it but because we failed to implement a coherent, coordinated mask policy, because we have taken an ineffective, patchwork approach to our COVID-19 response, cases and deaths continue to rise,” she said.

Early in the pandemic, Kelly issued statewide mandates to wear masks and close some businesses but the GOP-led Legislature pushed back and passed a law that requires a Republican-majority council to approve the governor's emergency executive orders. That led to allowing counties to decide individually if they would follow the orders.

That lack of a coherent, statewide response to the coronavirus — along with Kansas Republican leaders' refusal to expand Medicaid — endangers residents' lives and is a factor that companies consider when deciding whether to move to Kansas, she said.

“We must provide prospective employers with certainty that their employees and their families will have access to affordable health care,” she said. “Our state path to economic growth is dependent upon healthy Kansans.”

In Johnson County, health officials urged more than 100 people who had contact with a person who tested positive for COVID-19 at an elementary school in Overland Park to quarantine for 14 days, but some parents are objecting to the recommendation.

The county health department said the positive case involved a person at Timber Creek Elementary School in the Blue Valley district, but they did not say if a student or staff member was infected.

The department sent a letter Saturday to Blue Valley Superintendent Tonya Merrigan, urging affected individuals to abide by the quarantine.

Sanmi Areola, county health director, said on Monday that the 14-day quarantine is the appropriate action to contain the spread, The Kansas City Star <a target="&mdash;blank" href="https://www.kansascity.com/news/local/education/article245891520.html">reported</a>.

Elementary students returned to a mix of remote and in-person schooling in Blue Valley on Sept. 9. The district currently plans to bring elementary students back to in-person classes full time on Oct. 5.

Several parents who want to return now to full-time, in-person classes protested at the school Sunday. Christine White, a pediatrician who has frequently called for schools to reopen, hosted the rally.

She said in a Facebook post that the quarantine was a “massive overreaction.”

"Please understand that if we let this action by the health department and school go unchecked and we let them slide, then they will know we have a breaking point where we will just lay down and accept the crumbs of an education for our children,” she wrote.

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Blue Valley middle, high school students to begin hybrid learning October 5th

FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) – Blue Valley announced Monday night that all students who are registered for in-person learning will attend school in-person at least two days per week.

The <a href="https://www.bluevalleyk12.org/Page/35659" target="_blank">Blue Valley School District</a> announced that middle and high school students will begin a hybrid learning model on October 5th.

“With mitigation strategies in place, middle and high school students will begin the hybrid (limiting capacity) model on Oct. 5. It is important that students are experiencing in-person instruction as often as possible. The middle and high school hybrid schedule will alternate in-person and at-home learning days on an AA/BB schedule, and will not include the distance learning day in the current elementary hybrid model. While this alternating pattern means the in-person and at-home days will look different each week, this schedule offers maximum in-person time which we know is a priority for our families. The assignment to an A or B attendance day is dependent on the last name of the oldest child in the family--Group A is last names A-L and Group B is last names M-Z. Principals will be sending more detailed hybrid schedules later this week,” the school district said.

Students who registered for the all-virtual option or VirtualED, are not impacted by these changes in learning mode.

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Missouri man waits for Missouri Supreme Court ruling, has already spent 26 years in prison- called innocent by current prosecutor

FAIRWAY, KS (KCTV) - Lamar Johnson has spent more than half of his life in prison for the 1994 murder of his friend Marcus Boyd.

Johnson had an alibi and thought speaking with police would clear things up. 26 years have now rolled by.

“They just made up case. And I don’t know how else to say it. I hate to say it. That’s exactly what happened. There’s no motive, no physical evidence, nothing to say I had something to do with this case,” Johnson said.

There are so many details in the investigation and trial which now seem shocking in hindsight. Johnson was largely convicted based on eyewitness testimony that identified him as the gunman in the dark, despite the fact that the killer wore a full-face mask.

“I want people to know that regardless of whether you’re white, Black, republican or democrat that this could happen to anybody,” Johnson said.

How should Conviction Integrity Units work? St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner took another look at Johnson’s case years ago. It took Gardner a full 70 pages to outline everything that went wrong.

She didn’t mince her words using phrases like unconstitutional police investigation and prosecutorial misconduct on the very first page. She ended her summary flat out calling what happened as, “Johnson’s wrongful conviction.”

Inside she outlines how others have admitted to the crime and cleared Johnson. She also details how the witness was compensated through a legal fund- something Johnson’s legal team had suspected for years.

Gardner filed a motion asking for a new trial, but a circuit court judge decided there should be a legal counterbalance.

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt’s office is arguing it’s not the place of a prosecutor to argue on behalf of a defendant.

Gardner has maintained a prosecutor should seek justice not a conviction rate. The whole legal mess has been bouncing through the courts for more than a year.

“He’s somewhat confused that things are out in the open and the facts out and he’s still waiting for a hearing. He’s a little frustrated,” said Lindsay Runnels, Johnson’s attorney.

The Missouri Supreme Court heard the issue in May but has yet to make a ruling.

In the meantime, Johnson waits in a prison where sections are on lockdown due to the coronavirus.

“It’s amazing to me that you really get down to the grit of this case. I am being denied just a simple hearing because of a procedural technicality and that cannot be more important that the possibility of somebody being wrongfully imprisoned for the rest of their lives,” said Johnson. “Missouri can do better. It can do better.”

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Barr announces $100M more to combat human trafficking

ATLANTA (AP) — U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr says the federal government is awarding more than $100 million in grants to target human trafficking.

The money will go to task forces combatting human trafficking, to victim services and victim housing.

Barr made the announcement Monday in Atlanta with presidential adviser Ivanka Trump and Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp.

“This is one of the top enforcement priorities of the department and we’re on the forefront of this fight," Barr said.

President Donald Trump's administration in August awarded $35 million in Justice Department grants to organizations that provide safe housing for victims of human trafficking.

“It's only by cooperating with all our partners, our state and local partners and those in the private sector that we're going to be able to make any progress and ultimately end the victimization of those boys and girls,” Barr said.

The wife of the Republican Kemp, Marty Kemp, has made human trafficking a focus of her work as Georgia's first lady.

“The governor and the first lady here have been second to none in the nation in taking this fight on and working closely with the federal government and I really appreciate that," Barr said.

Georgia Bureau of Investigation Director Vic Reynolds said grants are already helping to pay for agents on a state task force that investigates human trafficking.

Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr, an elected Republican, said money for housing for victims is crucial, saying it “means safety and it means security, and it means wraparound services.”

Others in the room said it was still important to push for broader action.

“We have to live with a sense of urgency to be able to rescue as many lives as possible,” said athlete Tim Tebow.

Michael Yeager, U.S. Marshal for northern Georgia, talked about the results of Operation Not Forgotten, in which the U.S. Marshals announced in August the rescue of 26 children and location of 13 others. Of those 15, appeared to be victims of sex trafficking.

“We’re trained to hunt fugitives, so we’ve changed that and parlayed that into now hunting these children," Yeager said.

The U.S. Marshals later debunked social media claims that all 39 children were found in one place, a rumor that appeared to be fed by believers in the QAnon conspiracy theory, which falsely claims that Donald Trump is trying to dismantle wide-ranging child sex ring among American elites.

Monday's announcement came after Barr, Trump and the Kemps toured the Georgia Center for Child Advocacy southwest of downtown Atlanta. There, center employees told the visitors about their work, including efforts to make sure that caregivers of children who have been abused get counseling and help.

“Some of our families have such basic needs that need to be met, that the fact that their child has experienced this trauma is not even the highest on their list right now,” said Amy Shipp, a family advocate.

The center also has a program that seeks to help teenagers in foster care get the education, work experience and life experience they need to be able to take care of themselves when they become adults.

“We actually prepare them for young adulthood,” said Giselle Balfour.

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Kansas school wants 100 to quarantine; parents protest

LIBERTY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly said Monday she is increasingly concerned the state does not have the infrastructure and policies in place to stop a continuing increase in confirmed cases of the coronavirus

On Monday, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported 53,959 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 600 deaths since the pandemic began. That’s an increase of 1,674 cases and four deaths over the weekend.

The governor said the state has consistently confirmed an average of about 500 new cases per day in the recent weeks, particularly as schools are reopening, sports have resumed and flu season is quickly approaching.

“We knew this was coming, we knew we could prepare for it but because we failed to implement a coherent, coordinated mask policy, because we have taken an ineffective, patchwork approach to our COVID-19 response, cases and deaths continue to rise,” she said.

Early in the pandemic, Kelly issued statewide mandates to wear mask and close some businesses but the GOP-led Legislature pushed back and passed a law that requires a Republican-majority council to approve the governor's emergency executive orders. That led to allowing counties to decide individually if they would follow the orders.

That lack of a coherent, statewide response to the coronavirus — along with Kansas Republican leaders' refusal to expand Medicaid — endangers residents' lives and is a factor that companies consider when deciding whether to move to Kansas she said.

“We must provide prospective employers with certainty that their employees and their families will have access to affordable health care,” she said “Our state path to economic growth is dependent upon healthy Kansans.”

In Johnson County on Monday, health officials are urging more than 100 people who had contact with a person who tested positive for COVID-19 at at an elementary school in Overland Park to quarantine for 14 days, but some parents are objecting to the recommendation.

The county health department said the positive case involved a person at Timber Creek Elementary School in the Blue Valley district, but they did not say if a student or staff member was infected.

The department sent a letter Saturday to Blue Valley Superintendent Tonya Merrigan, urging affected individuals to abide by the quarantine.

Sanmi Areola, county health director, said on Monday that the 14-day quarantine is the appropriate action to contain the spread, The Kansas City Star <a target="&mdash;blank" href="https://www.kansascity.com/news/local/education/article245891520.html">reported</a>.

Elementary students returned to a mix of remote and in-person schooling in Blue Valley on Sept. 9. The district currently plans to bring elementary students back to in-person classes full time on Oct. 5.

Several parents who want to return now to full-time, in-person classes protested at the school Sunday. Christine White, a pediatrician who has frequently called for schools to reopen, hosted the rally.

She said in a Facebook post that the quarantine was a “massive overreaction.”

"Please understand that if we let this action by the health department and school go unchecked and we let them slide, then they will know we have a breaking point where we will just lay down and accept the crumbs of an education for our children,” she wrote.

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Chiefs provided needed boost to local bars

Chiefs provided needed boost to local bars

OVERLAND PARK, KS (KCTV) - If you can’t watch another sporting event from your couch, then you’re probably searching for “patio seating near me.” The problem is everybody has the same idea.

“Crazy was the best word for it,” Maloney’s General Manager Scott Wenta said.

Packed Patios for the prominent Patrick Mahomes was a breath of fresh air.

“Upstairs was packed, downstairs was packed, inside was packed, for what we can do,” Wenta said. “This is your virtual tailgate here.”

People wanting to enjoy the game in the open air, were met with long wait times at Coach’s.

“Yesterday felt like it was September in 2019 and hopefully 2021,” Coach’s Bar and Grill Owner Brian Darby said.

Darby says their patio was as full as it could be with Chiefs fans.

“It felt good to be back to normal. I don’t want to say new normal because this felt like old normal, upstairs anyway,” Darby said.

Darby says the last few months without sports to draw a crowd was nerve-wrecking.

“Struggling was an understatement. It was borderline going under,” Darby said.

Now, the Chiefs aren’t the only ones in Kansas City breaking records. Moloney’s says outside of St. Patrick’s Day and the Super Bowl, Sunday was the highest-grossing sales day ever.

“I think people are just tired of being locked in. I think they want places to go and now that football season is back, it’s something they can go out and experience,” Wenta said.

With fans back in their chairs, the Coach’s staff is starting to feel the benefits.

“The staff is happy again. There’s nothing worse than coming to work and the restaurant being ¼ full or ½ full. The money is stretched thin and you have to choose which employees work and which don’t. But, with the Chiefs and the patio, everybody gets to work, everybody gets to participate,” Darby said.

Restaurants are already looking forward to the next matchup.

If you want to make sure you have a patio seat for next Monday night, you are encouraged to make a reservation.

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