KCTV 5 Popular Stories

Governor picks appeals court judge for Kansas Supreme Court

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly on Monday appointed state Court of Appeals Judge Melissa Taylor Standridge to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court, despite the objections of the state’s most influential anti-abortion group.

“As governor, the process of appointing justices to the Kansas Supreme Court is one I take very seriously,” Kelly said in a news release. “Not only must justices have knowledge of the law, but also a complex and nuanced understanding of the world and the people the law is intended to govern.”

<a target="&mdash;blank" href="https://apnews.com/article/state-courts-wichita-kansas-topeka-courts-db6e75753e0453fde25a32f620962dc5">This was Kelly’s third appointment to the seven-member court</a> in less than two years in office. Under the state constitution, her choice is not subject to review by the Republican-controlled Legislature, a sore point for some conservative lawmakers. Governors have had to win Senate confirmation since 2013 for nominees to the state’s second-highest court, the Court of Appeals.

Standridge will fill the vacancy created by the retirement of Justice Carol Beier.

Anti-abortion group Kansans for Life opposed Standridge's appointment because she sided in a 2016 ruling with other judges who said the state constitution protects abortion rights. The appeals court split 7-7, and the Kansas Supreme Court ruled last year that access to abortion is a “fundamental” right under the state’s Bill of Rights.

Standridge has been a judge on the Court of Appeals since 2008 and has authored nearly 1,000 opinions. Before that she served as chambers counsel to U.S. District Magistrate Judge David Waxse from 1999 to 2008.

Her experience also includes a stint working as an associate attorney for Shook, Hardy, and Bacon, where she was a founding member of the firm’s award-winning diversity and inclusion initiative.

“The totality of her life and career experience makes her preeminently qualified to sit on the Kansas Supreme Court,” Kelly said.

Kelly said Standridge has gathered “a wealth of legal expertise that makes her more than prepared to join the Supreme Court.” But the governor also cited Standridge's firsthand experience navigating the system both as a judge and foster parent to numerous youngsters.

Standridge said that to serve on the state's highest court is “the honor of the lifetime,” but she doesn't view it as just a capstone to her career. She said the Supreme Court justices have difficult jobs.

“But I believe that my years as a judge on the Court of Appeals, my extensive experience working with judges and lawyers from across our state, and my broad life experiences outside the law have prepared me for this challenge,” she said.

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'We’re drowning at the hospital;' Doctor starts petition to get Missouri Gov. to implement mask mandate

ST. LOUIS (KMOV.com) - A St. Louis-area doctor is pushing Missouri Governor Mike Parson to issue a statewide mask mandate in an effort to save lives amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Micah Luderer, an internal medicine resident at Barnes Jewish Hospital, said he treats COVID-19 patients and witnesses the exhaustion from other doctors and nurses on a weekly basis. Luderer believes part of the solution to stopping the spread of coronavirus is mandating masks throughout the state.

“We’re drowning at the hospital,” Luderer said. “People are dying every day from COVID-19 and we’re not doing everything in our power to stop the virus.”

Tuesday, Luderer wrote and published a <a href="https://www.change.org/p/every-2-days-more-people-die-of-covid-19-than-the-september-11th-terrorist-attacks?original_footer_petition_id=13509526&amp;algorithm=promoted&amp;source_location=petition_footer&amp;grid_position=13&amp;pt=AVBldGl0aW9uAOrJjAEAAAAAX775V%2FKIDj85MzdiZDY4NQ%3D%3D" target="_blank">petition</a> called “Wear a Mask. Save a Life.” The petition compares the fight against coronavirus to a war, saying “defense doesn’t require heavy ammunition or soldiers, but simply wearing a mask.”

Missouri is one of 13 states without a mask mandate. Parson has repeatedly said he will not issue a statewide mask mandate and instead will leave it up to county officials to decide. Luderer said he and his colleagues often feel overworked and defeated leaving their shifts.

“Sometimes we feel like a firefighters, I go to work all day and I fight fires and then on my drive home, I see people mixing in the community, not wearing masks, starting fires all over again,” Luderer said.

The petition had nearly 2,400 signatures as of Sunday. News 4 asked several people if they support the petition. The majority of people we asked said yes, however Damien Paul believes masks should be a more personal decision.

“I think it should be up to businesses and individuals to take initiative to make the choice themselves,” Paul said.

Luderer said he’s already emailed the 10 largest colleges and universities in Missouri asking for faculty and students to sign the petition. He plans to submit the petition electronically and through the mail this week to the Governor’s office.

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14-year-old killed by man he was attempting to carjack in St. Louis, police say

JENNINGS, Mo. (KMOV.com) – A 14-year-old was killed by the person he was trying to carjack Sunday afternoon in Jennings, according to St. Louis County police.

Authorities said the unidentified teenager and another person were attempting to carjack a 53- year-old man in the 9300 block of Lewis and Clark Road around 3:45 p.m. The reported victim allegedly shot the boy during the incident.

After attempting to run from the scene, the injured teenager was taken to the hospital, where he died hours later.

The shooter was taken into custody, police said.

A weapon was recovered from the man and teen, according to police.

The juvenile’s suspected accomplice has not been found.

The St. Louis County Police Department’s Bureau of Crimes Against Persons is leading the ongoing investigation. Anyone with information is asked to call police or CrimeStoppers.

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What NOT to buy on Cyber Monday

What NOT to buy on Cyber Monday

If you're shopping online for Cyber Monday, here are five things you should wait until next year to purchase.

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KCTV5 News Afternoon Update: November 30, 2020

KCTV5 News Afternoon Update: November 30, 2020

Traditions kept and traditions broken -- the metro's top doctors will be watching closely over the coming weeks for fallout from the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.

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FORECAST: Light, wintry mix arrives Wednesday night

FORECAST: Light, wintry mix arrives Wednesday night

November will end with a clear sky from the evening hours through the overnight while a light southerly breeze drifts in at less than 7 mph sending temperatures tumbling back into the lower 20s by daybreak. Sunshine will return Tuesday as temperatures work into the upper 40s which is a few degrees better than normal. The next weather system to impact our area arrives Wednesday night with the potential for a very light wintry mix through mid-day Thursday.

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CVS, Walgreens preparing to be among first in U.S. to give coronavirus vaccines once approved

CVS, Walgreens preparing to be among first in U.S. to give coronavirus vaccines once approved

(CNN) -- CVS and Walgreens are preparing to be among the first companies in the u-s to give coronavirus vaccines if the FDA approves one for emergency use.

Those vaccinations would take place in long-term care facilities, not retail stores.

In October, the Trump administration announced agreements with both companies to give vaccinations to long-term care facility residents nationwide.

Advisers to the CDC have called for an emergency meeting Tuesday.

They will vote in part on whether to recommend that residents in those facilities be among the first in the u-s to get a coronavirus vaccine.

A CVS spokesperson said they expect to be giving vaccine shots at long term care facilities in mid-December.

Walgreens expects to start doing so within days of receiving vaccine doses.

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Coronavirus Update: Moderna asking US, European regulators to OK its virus shots

Coronavirus Update: Moderna asking US, European regulators to OK its virus shots

Here's today's COVID-19 update sponsored by Partners in Primary Care.

<a href="https://partnersinprimarycare.com/">https://partnersinprimarycare.com/</a>

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Wanted: Jason Jenkins

INDEPENDENCE, MO (KCTV) -- Jason Jenkins is wanted on a Clay County failure to appear in court warrant for sex offender registration violation.

The original offense happened in 2003 in Independence and involved the sexual assault of a girl less than 5 years old.

His last known address was in Kearney.

He is a noncompliant registered sex offender in Clay County.

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Police ID body found in Kansas City neighborhood

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -- Kansas City police are investigating what appears to be the city's 168th homicide of 2020.

Police reported out to 37th and Agnes around 6:30 p.m. on a report of a body being found.

A man was found between two homes, according to police.

When the victim was being transported, investigators discovered injuries that were consistent with foul play.

The victim was positively identified as 34-year-old Martez Z. Brock.

No official cause has been released, but the incident is being investigated as a homicide.

If anyone has information on this case, you are urged to call the TIPS hotline at 816-474-TIPS.

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Biden to nominate Yellen, highlight diversity on econ team

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — <a target="&mdash;blank" href="https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-wins-white-house-ap-fd58df73aa677acb74fce2a69adb71f9">President-elect Joe Biden</a> on Monday announced his senior economic team, including his plans to nominate the first woman to head the Treasury Department as well as several liberal economists and policy specialists who established their credentials during the previous two Democratic administrations.

In a statement, Biden said he would nominate Janet Yellen, the former Federal Reserve chair, to lead the Treasury Department, and former Clinton and Obama adviser Neera Tanden to serve as director of the Office of Management and Budget. He also named Wally Adeyemo, a former Obama administration official and the first CEO of the former president's nonprofit foundation, as his nominee for deputy treasury secretary. He also unveiled his White House economic team, consisting of economists Cecilia Rouse, Jared Bernstein and Heather Boushey.

Biden, who has placed a premium on diversity in his selection of Cabinet nominees and key advisers, is looking to notch a few firsts with his economic team selections. Yellen would be the first woman to lead the Treasury Department and Adeyemo the first Black deputy secretary. Tanden would be the first woman of color to lead OMB and Rouse the first woman of color to chair the Council of Economic Advisers.

“As we get to work to control the virus, this is the team that will deliver immediate economic relief for the American people during this economic crisis and help us build our economy back better than ever," Biden said in a statement.

Yellen became Federal Reserve chair in 2014 when the economy was still recovering from the devastating Great Recession. In the late 1990s, she was President Bill Clinton’s top economic adviser during the Asian financial crisis. Under Biden she would lead the Treasury Department with the economy in the grip of a surging pandemic.

If confirmed, Yellen would become the first woman to lead the Treasury Department in its nearly 232-year history. She would inherit an economy with still-high unemployment, escalating threats to small businesses and signs that consumers are retrenching as the pandemic restricts or discourages spending.

Tanden, the president and CEO of the liberal think tank Center for American Progress, has been tapped to serve as the director of the Office of Management and Budget. She was the director of domestic policy for the Obama-Biden presidential campaign, but she first made her mark in the Clinton orbit.

She served as policy director for Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign. Before that, she served as legislative director in Clinton’s Senate office and deputy campaign manager and issues director for Clinton’s 2000 Senate campaign. Tanden was a senior policy adviser in the Bill Clinton administration.

If confirmed, she would be the first woman of color and the first South Asian woman to lead the OMB, the agency that oversees the federal budget.

But Senate Republicans are signaling they’ll oppose confirmation. Late Sunday a spokesman for GOP Sen. John Cornyn of Texas tweeted that Tanden “stands zero chance of being confirmed.” And Josh Holmes, a political adviser to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, tweeted that confirmation was likely doomed. Republicans hold the edge in the current Senate, although next year’s majority won’t be decided until Jan. 5 runoffs in two races involving GOP incumbents in Georgia.

Brian Deese, a former senior economic adviser in the Obama administration and now the managing director and global head of sustainable investing at BlackRock, is expected to be named director of the White House National Economic Council, according to a person familiar with transition plans who was not authorized to speak on the matter.

Deese worked on the auto bailout and environmental issues in the Obama White House, where he held the title of deputy director of both the NEC and the OMB

Cecilia Rouse, a labor economist and head of Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs, is Biden's pick to serve as chairwoman of the Council of Economic Advisers. She served on the CEA from 2009 to 2011, and served on the NEC from 1998 to 1999 in the Clinton administration.

Notably, she organized a letter earlier this year signed by more than 100 economists calling for more government action to mitigate the fallout for Americans caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Rouse, who is Black, would be the first woman of color to chair the CEA.

Biden also named Heather Boushey, the president and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, and Jared Bernstein, who served as an economic adviser to Biden during the Obama administration, to serve on the council. Both Boushey and Bernstein advised Biden during the presidential campaign.

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Associated Press writers Alexandra Jaffe, Christopher Rugaber and Michael Balsamo contributed to this report.

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Melania Trump's White House holiday decor spotlights essential workers

(CNN) -- 'Tis the holiday season at the White House. All of the halls, from the East Room to the Red Room, were decked by over 125 volunteers this weekend and unveiled Monday to feature classic holiday décor with an "America the Beautiful" theme for the Trumps' final Christmas in office.

Highlights of this year's display -- coming during a global pandemic -- include a tribute to essential workers in the Red Room, including a light-up ceramic post office, and a tree with ornaments celebrating frontline workers, including a trash truck, scientist, caregiver, lab coat and nurse hat.

"We salute America's everyday heroes who serve as first responders and frontline workers. Handmade ornaments highlight the many professionals and volunteers who serve their communities with a spirit of generosity," according to first lady Melania Trump's office.

The first lady and <a href="http://www.cnn.com/specials/politics/president-donald-trump-45" target="_blank">President Donald Trump</a> are expected to host a spate of holiday parties this year with some safety measures in place despite the worsening pandemic.

This year, there are 106 wreaths, 62 trees, more than 1,200 feet of garland, more than 3,200 lights, more than 17,000 bows, and more than 150 types of foliage and floral, according to the first lady's office.

While <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2020/10/01/politics/melania-trump-tapes/index.html" target="_blank">former Melania Trump</a> friend and adviser Stephanie Winston Wolkoff recently released audio of the first lady questioning, "Who gives a f*** about Christmas?" the East Wing said she personally oversaw this year's decor.

"Mrs. Trump personally selected every detail of the holiday season at the White House, celebrating this land we are all proud to call home," the first lady's office said.

Significant thought and detail went into the Americana decorations.

In addition to honoring frontline workers, there is a Kennedy-themed tree in the Vermeil Room, with ornaments featuring an iconic portrait of President John F. Kennedy and sailboats. The tree sits beside the portrait of former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy.

"To preserve the White House for the American people, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy established the 'People's House' as a living museum and laid the foundation for expanding the diversity of the collection. Sharing in this love for arts and culture, President John F. Kennedy's official portrait is featured on the graceful trees," Melania Trump's office said.

A tree in the Library highlights the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment with a base featuring women's suffrage imagery designed by children in an artwork competition spearheaded by Trump. Another tree in this room features women who were "pioneers for gender equality," the first lady's office said, including artist Georgia O'Keeffe and aviator Harriet Quimby.

The East Colonnade, which famously <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2019/07/24/politics/melania-trump-christmas-mueller/index.html" target="_blank">featured controversial red, cranberry-covered trees</a> compared to the Handmaid's Tale in 2018, this year features tall black urns with foliage and greenery from each state and territory, according to the first lady's office.

The official tree, an 18.5-foot Fraser fir from West Virginia welcomed by the first lady last week, is decorated in the Blue Room with artwork ornaments from children around the country.

The Rose Garden is featured with the White House gingerbread for the first time this year, per the East Wing.

The East Room showcases planes, trains and automobiles, with airplanes and spacecraft hanging from greenery reflected in a large mirror and a "White House Express" train set.

And the China Room this year features a cozy kitchen scene with cookies and baked goods on a dining table, stockings embroidered with "POTUS," "FLOTUS," and "Barron" hanging from a fireplace mantel.

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Biden to nominate Yellen, highlights diversity on econ team

WILMINGTON (AP) — <a target="&mdash;blank" href="https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-wins-white-house-ap-fd58df73aa677acb74fce2a69adb71f9">President-elect Joe Biden</a> on Monday announced his senior economic team, including his plans to nominate the first woman to head the Treasury Department as well as a slew of liberal economists and policy specialists who established their credentials during the previous two Democratic administrations.

In a statement, Biden said he would nominate Janet Yellen, the former Federal Reserve chair, to lead the Treasury Department, and former Clinton and Obama adviser Neera Tanden to serve as director of the Office of Management and Budget. He also named Wally Adeyemo, a former Obama administration official and the first CEO of the former president's nonprofit foundation, as his nominee for Deputy Treasury Secretary, He also unveiled his White House economic team, consisting of economists Cecilia Rouse, Jared Bernstein and Heather Boushey.

Biden, who has placed a premium on diversity in his selection of Cabinet nominees and key advisers, is looking to notch at least a few firsts with his economic team selections. Yellen would be the first woman to lead the Treasury Department and Adeyemo the first Black deputy secretary. Tanden would be the first woman of color to lead OMB and Rouse the first woman of color to chair the Council of Economic Advisers.

“As we get to work to control the virus, this is the team that will deliver immediate economic relief for the American people during this economic crisis and help us build our economy back better than ever," Biden said in a statement.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below.

President-elect Joe Biden is expected in the coming days to name several of his most senior economic advisers, a group that includes several liberal economists and policy specialists who established their credentials during the previous two Democratic administrations.

Biden, who has placed a premium on diversity in his selection of Cabinet nominees and key advisers, is looking to notch at least a few firsts with his economic team selections.

The Biden campaign has not yet announced the picks, but these are some of the individuals he’s expected to select to high-profile positions on his economic team, according to people familiar with the transition process who were granted anonymity to speak freely about the president-elect’s deliberations:

JANET YELLEN, Treasury secretary

Yellen became Federal Reserve chair in 2014 when the economy was still recovering from the devastating Great Recession. In the late 1990s, she was President Bill Clinton’s top economic adviser during the Asian financial crisis. Under Biden she would lead the Treasury Department with the economy in the grip of a surging pandemic.

If confirmed, Yellen would become the first woman to lead the Treasury Department in its nearly 232-year history. She would inherit an economy with still-high unemployment, escalating threats to small businesses and signs that consumers are retrenching as the pandemic restricts or discourages spending.

NEERA TANDEN, Office of Management and Budget director

Tanden is the president and CEO of the liberal think tank Center for American Progress. She was the director of domestic policy for the Obama-Biden presidential campaign, but she first made her mark in the Clinton orbit.

Tanden served as policy director for Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign. Before that, she served as legislative director in Clinton’s Senate office and deputy campaign manager and issues director for Clinton’s 2000 Senate campaign. She also served as a senior policy adviser in the Bill Clinton administration.

If confirmed, she would be the first woman of color and the first South Asian woman to lead the OMB, the agency that oversees the federal budget.

But Senate Republicans are signaling they’ll oppose confirmation. Late Sunday a spokesman for GOP Sen. John Cornyn of Texas tweeted that Tanden “stands zero chance of being confirmed.” And Josh Holmes, a political adviser to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, tweeted that confirmation was likely doomed. Republicans hold the edge in the current Senate, although next year’s majority won’t be decided until Jan. 5 runoffs in two races involving GOP incumbents in Georgia.

BRIAN DEESE, director of the White House National Economic Council

Deese, a former senior economic adviser in the Obama administration and now the managing director and global head of sustainable investing at BlackRock, would be the top economic adviser in the Biden White House. He worked on the auto bailout and environmental issues in the Obama White House, where he held the title of deputy director of both the NEC and the OMB.

CECILIA ROUSE, chairwoman of the Council of Economic Advisers

Rouse is a labor economist and head of Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs. She served on the CEA from 2009 to 2011, and served on the NEC from 1998 to 1999 in the Clinton administration.

Notably, she organized a letter earlier this year signed by more than 100 economists calling for more government action to mitigate the fallout for Americans caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Rouse, who is Black, would be the first woman of color to chair the CEA.

Biden is also expected to name Heather Boushey, the president and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, and Jared Bernstein, who served as an economic adviser to Biden during the Obama administration, to serve on the council. Both Boushey and Bernstein advised Biden during the presidential campaign.

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Associated Press writers Alexandra Jaffe, Christopher Rugaber and Michael Balsamo contributed to this report.

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Bitcoin hits an all-time high of just under $20,000

(CNN) -- Bitcoin just hit <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/18/investing/bitcoin-prices-rally/index.html" target="_blank">another milestone</a> in its <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/20/investing/bitcoin-prices-gold-blackrock/index.html" target="_blank">impressive 2020 run</a>. The cryptocurrency surged 9% to a new all-time high of about $19,860 on Monday, topping the previous peak of $19,783 from December 2017.

It's been a wild year for <a href="https://money.cnn.com/quote/quote.html?symb=XBT" target="_blank">bitcoin</a>, which has soared more than 175% since the end of 2019. <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2020/03/13/investing/bitcoin-price-plunge-coronavirus/index.html" target="_blank">Prices plunged below $4,000 in March</a> as markets around the globe plummeted due to the Covid-19 economic crisis.

But bitcoin has rallied sharply in the past few months as the <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/03/investing/dollar-biden-trump/index.html" target="_blank">dollar has weakened</a>. Crucially, the cryptocurrency has also skyrocketed into the mainstream.

Payments giants Square and PayPal both now <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2020/10/21/investing/paypal-bitcoin-cryptocurrencies/index.html" target="_blank">allow their customers to buy and sell bitcoin</a>. Money management giant Fidelity is launching a bitcoin fund for wealthy investors. Bitcoin futures contracts are even trading on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

Prominent investment managers Paul Tudor Jones, Stanley Druckenmiller and Mike Novogratz are bullish on bitcoin as well.

In other words, the days of bitcoin being considered just a fringe investment are over. The cryptocurrency has gone legit.

"This rally is driven by smart and institutional money and not built solely on retail over-speculation," said Guy Hirsch, managing director for the US at eToro, brokerage and trading firm, in an e-mail to CNN Business. "So many more individuals and asset managers are now buying in."

The amount of bitcoin currently in circulation is now worth more than $365 billion.

Bitcoin also got a recent boost after a top strategist at BlackRock, the world's largest asset management firm, suggested that bitcoin could one day <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/20/investing/bitcoin-prices-gold-blackrock/index.html" target="_blank">replace gold</a> as a safe-haven currency of choice.

The epic rise in bitcoin has also fueled even more dramatic spikes in smaller cryptocurrencies such as ethereum, XRP, litecoin and Stellar as of late. That may continue.

"Bitcoin hitting a new all-time high...will likely spur a tidal wave of retail investment that pushes bitcoin much higher in short order," said Denis Vinokourov, head of research at digital assets prime broker Bequant, in an e-mail to CNN Business.

"However, it is unlikely that this inflow will be limited to bitcoin only," he added. "The ease of access to other assets is much more straightforward than what it was during the last bull run."

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First blood test to help diagnose Alzheimer's goes on sale

A company has started selling the first blood test to help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, a leap for the field that could make it much easier for people to learn whether they have dementia. It also raises concern about the accuracy and impact of such life-altering news.

Independent experts are leery because key test results have not been published and the test has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration — it's being sold under more general rules for commercial labs. But they agree that a simple test that can be done in a doctor’s office has long been needed.

It might have spared Tammy Maida a decade of futile trips to doctors who chalked up her symptoms to depression, anxiety or menopause before a $5,000 brain scan last year finally showed she had Alzheimer’s.

“I now have an answer,” said the 63-year-old former nurse from San Jose, California.

If a blood test had been available, “I might have been afraid of the results” but would have “jumped on that” to find out, she said.

More than 5 million people in the United States and millions more around the world have Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia. To be diagnosed with it, people must have symptoms such as memory loss plus evidence of a buildup of a protein called beta-amyloid in the brain.

The best way now to measure the protein is a costly PET brain scan that usually is not covered by insurance. That means most people don’t get one and are left wondering if their problems are due to normal aging, Alzheimer’s or something else.

The blood test from C2N Diagnostics of St. Louis aims to fill that gap. The company's founders include Drs. David Holtzman and Randall Bateman of Washington University School of Medicine, who headed research that led to the test and are included on a patent that the St. Louis university licensed to C2N.

ABOUT THE TEST

The test is not intended for general screening or for people without symptoms — it’s aimed at people 60 and older who are having thinking problems and are being evaluated for Alzheimer’s. It’s not covered by insurance or Medicare; the company charges $1,250 and offers discounts based on income. Only doctors can order the test and results come within 10 days. It's sold in all but a few states in the U.S. and just was cleared for sale in Europe.

It measures two types of amyloid particles plus various forms of a protein that reveal whether someone has a gene that raises risk for the disease. These factors are combined in a formula that includes age, and patients are given a score suggesting low, medium or high likelihood of having amyloid buildup in the brain.

If the test puts them in the low category, “it’s a strong reason to look for other things” besides Alzheimer’s, Bateman said.

“There are a thousand things that can cause someone to be cognitively impaired,” from vitamin deficiencies to medications, Holtzman said.

“I don’t think this is any different than the testing we do now” except it’s from a blood test rather than a brain scan, he said. “And those are not 100% accurate either.”

ACCURACY CLAIMS

The company has not published any data on the test’s accuracy, although the doctors have published on the amyloid research leading to the test. Company promotional materials cite results comparing the test to PET brain scans — the current gold standard — in 686 people, ages 60-91, with cognitive impairment or dementia.

If a PET scan showed amyloid buildup, the blood test also gave a high probability of that in 92% of cases and missed 8% of them, said the company’s chief executive, Dr. Joel Braunstein.

If the PET scan was negative, the blood test ruled out amyloid buildup 77% of the time. The other 23% got a positive result, but that doesn't necessarily mean the blood test was incorrect, Braunstein said. The <a target="&mdash;blank" href="https://n.neurology.org/content/93/17/e1647">published research</a> suggests it may detect amyloid buildup before it's evident on scans.

Braunstein said the company will seek FDA approval and the agency has given it a designation that can speed review. He said study results would be published, and he defended the decision to start selling the test now.

“Should we be holding that technology back when it could have a big impact on patient care?" he asked.

WHAT OTHERS SAY

Dr. Eliezer Masliah, neuroscience chief at the U.S. National Institute on Aging, said the government funded some of the work leading to the test as well as other kinds of blood tests.

“I would be cautious about interpreting any of these things,” he said of the company’s claims. “We’re encouraged, we’re interested, we’re funding this work but we want to see results.”

Heather Snyder of the Alzheimer’s Association said it won't endorse a test without FDA approval. The test also needs to be studied in larger and diverse populations.

“It’s not quite clear how accurate or generalizable the results are,” she said.

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Marilynn Marchione can be followed on Twitter at http://twitter.com/MMarchioneAP.

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The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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'Pandemic' is, unsurprisingly, the Word of the Year for Merriam-Webster and Dictionary.com

(CNN) -- You've probably <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/11/health/coronavirus-pandemic-world-health-organization/index.html" target="_blank">heard the word near-daily since March</a>. It's dominated nearly every corner of the world since. And there's no better word to sum up the unbelievable year that was 2020.

<a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/25/health/what-is-a-pandemic-explainer/index.html" target="_blank">"Pandemic"</a> is the Word of the Year for both Merriam-Webster and Dictionary.com. It informed top searches on both sites and reshaped the language we use daily, both companies said.

Merriam-Webster, the dictionary publisher, said people looked up "pandemic" with "remarkable frequency" throughout the year -- particularly on March 11, <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/11/health/coronavirus-pandemic-world-health-organization/index.html" target="_blank">when the World Health Organization officially declared Covid-19 a pandemic</a>. On that day, searches for "pandemic" spiked 115,806% compared to the same day in 2019.

Many of the other top searches on the site were related to the pandemic, including <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/20/health/cdc-coronavirus-spread-asymptomatic-website-wellness/index.html" target="_blank">"asymptomatic,"</a> <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/27/health/post-thanksgiving-quarantine-reduce-risk-wellness/index.html" target="_blank">"quarantine"</a> and, of course, <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/31/health/what-is-coronavirus-covid-19-wellness/index.html" target="_blank">"coronavirus."</a> And because so many people flocked to Merriam-Webster to define "Covid-19," the mild to severe respiratory illness that is caused by a coronavirus, the word was added to the dictionary within just over one month of its first use.

Dictionary.com said that "pandemic" -- its Word of the Year, too -- is the "defining context of 2020." Now, terms like <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/21/health/social-distancing-coronavirus-faq-wellness-trnd/index.html" target="_blank">"social distancing,"</a> <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/09/opinions/us-canada-covid-19-bociurkiw/index.html" target="_blank">"flatten the curve"</a> and <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/01/health/herd-immunity-coronavirus-pandemic-explainer-wellness/index.html" target="_blank">"herd immunity"</a> aren't just used by health professionals -- the public understands them, too.

"Specialized lingo, spanning topics from epidemiology to social behavior, formed a shared -- and ever-expanding -- glossary for daily life," the online dictionary said in its announcement.

Both dictionaries also included "defund" among their top words of the year. The word reached a wider audience in June amid calls to <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/06/us/what-is-defund-police-trnd/index.html" target="_blank">"defund the police,"</a> or withdraw funding from police departments, after George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis.

The rest of the words both dictionaries chose read like a monthly guide to the year that was. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/specials/politics/trump-impeachment" target="_blank">President Donald Trump's impeachment trial</a> dominated Dictionary.com's first two months of the year. And Merriam-Webster honored the <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/26/us/kobe-bryant-obituary/index.html" target="_blank">late Kobe Bryant</a>, who died in a helicopter crash in January, by highlighting his nickname, "<a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/27/us/black-mamba-kobe-bryant-spt-trnd/index.html" target="_blank">Mamba</a>."

You can find Dictionary.com's full list, including lingo like <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/30/us/karen-meme-trnd/index.html" target="_blank">"Karen"</a> and "doomscrolling," <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-year/" target="_blank">here</a>. Read Merriam-Webster's top 11 words of the year -- <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/10/23/us/most-searched-words-debate-trnd/index.html" target="_blank">"malarkey"</a> among them -- <a href="https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/word-of-the-year/pandemic" target="_blank">here</a>.

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Multi-car crash into work zone shuts down I-435 bridge at Front Street in Kansas City

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -- Police on Monday morning temporarily shut down all northbound lanes of I-435 at Front Street in Kansas City, after multiple vehicles were involved in a crash in a construction area.

Emergency crews responded to the scene shortly after 8 a.m. and shut down the northbound lanes. Police said there are injuries involved in this crash, but did not know exactly how many and to what extent.

An SUV and a white sedan were at least two of the vehicles that were involved.

The crash was cleared, and lanes were opened back up around 8:50 a.m.

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Porch piracy responsible for billions in thefts

Porch piracy responsible for billions in thefts

MISSION, KS (KCTV) – Cyber Monday is one of the busiest days of the year for online shopping. As we browse websites looking for deals, a new study shows there are more thieves browsing our patios in search of packages to steal.

<a href="https://www.finder.com/porch-pirates-statistics" target="_blank">This study by Finder.com</a> says porch pirates are accounting for $5.4 billion in package thefts over the past year. That averages to around $157 worth of merchandise for the average American.

Experts predict the problem is only going to get worse as online purchases are on the increase because of the pandemic. Of those online transactions, the survey says more than two-thirds will be packages that are delivered to the home.

If you are the victim of one of these thefts, or you see suspicious activity in your community, its important that you relay the information to your local law enforcement agency.

“Looking out for your neighbors and being vigilant in your neighborhood is really important,” says Captain Kirk Lane of the Mission, KS Police Department. “One person’s call may be that information that we need that could link this to hundreds or multiple thefts that have occurred, and that sometimes happens off of that one tip so please don’t be afraid to call us.”

After notifying police, letting neighbors know through social media platforms like Facebook or Nextdoor is always a good idea too.

The Finder.com survey also recommends using a PO Box, a home security camera or requiring a signature release on delivery to further protect yourself. One surprising find from the study, about one in nine victims of porch pirates admit to stealing packages themselves! As we head into the holiday seasons, let us remember that two wrongs don’t make a right.

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Supreme Court hears arguments in Trump plan to cut undocumented immigrants from Census

The <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/27/politics/supreme-court-justices-personal-tone/index.html" target="_blank">Supreme Court</a> on Monday will return and take up another of President Donald Trump's immigration-related policies as it considers the attempt to exclude undocumented immigrants from being counted in the Census totals when seats in Congress are divvied up between the states next year.

It's the second time in two terms that the justices will take on the 2020 Census, having previously <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2019/09/12/politics/john-roberts-census-citizenship-supreme-court/index.html" target="_blank">blocked Trump's attempt to add a citizenship question</a>.

If Trump succeeds in the new case, it could mark the first time that the United States excludes undocumented immigrants when it counts individuals so that seats in the US House of Representatives can be apportioned and also will impact the distribution of federal funds.

"The 2020 Census is about power and money," said Thomas Wolf, senior counsel for the Brennan Center.

"These numbers will determine how seats in Congress are split up over the next 10 years which will determine the political power that communities will have for the next decade and will determine whether they receive their fair share of the $1.5 trillion that is annually distributed by the federal government," Wolf added.

Trump's efforts are complicated by the fact that Census officials have indicated that they are having difficulties processing census responses to produce the final count. If the numbers are transferred to the President after inauguration day on January 20, Trump's initiative is unlikely to be executed by the Biden administration and the case may be moot.

The Constitution provides that representatives "shall be apportioned" among the states counting the "whole number of persons in each State" every 10 years.

Congress has directed the Secretary of Commerce to conduct the census and submit the tabulation to the President by December 31. The President, in turn, transmits the number to Congress usually around the first week or so of January.

Trump issued a memo issued in July outlining a new policy mandating that undocumented immigrants be excluded from the apportionment base. It directed the Commerce secretary to actually submit two numbers to the President. The first is the census count. The second excludes undocumented immigrants. The government says that other administrative records could be used to determine individuals' immigration status.

Acting Solicitor General Jeff Wall told the court that the "President is the ultimate decisionmaker" concerning the contents of the Census and that the law does not "expressly require" him to use the data submitted by the secretary, but instead, the data from the count can be combined with administrative records for apportionment.

In addition, the language from the Constitution and statutes "has long been understood to cover only a state's inhabitants," Wall argued in court papers. "As history, precedent, and structure indicate, the President need not treat all illegal aliens as inhabitants of the States and thereby allow their defiance of federal law to distort the allocation of the people's representatives," Wall said.

A group of states and local officials, as well as organizations represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, sued.

A three-judge court in the Southern District of New York blocked the White House policy.

"Throughout the Nation's history, the figures used to determine the apportionment of Congress have included every person residing in the United States at the time of the census, whether citizen or non-citizen and whether living here with legal status or without," the court held.

Trump's memo, the court stressed, violates "Congress's mandate to use the results of the census -- and only the results of the census -- in connection with the apportionment process."

Lawyers for the states told the justices that "nothing in the text or history of the Constitution or the Census Act suggests that Appellants may treat millions of people who undisputedly live here as if they were not here, solely because of their immigration status."

And the ACLU's Dale Ho, representing individual groups, argue that the three branches of government over "more than two centuries all point to a single conclusion: the Constitution requires counting all persons in each state in the apportionment base -- including undocumented immigrants."

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Baby boom happening in Kansas City nine months after Super Bowl win

Baby boom happening in Kansas City nine months after Super Bowl win

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -- It has been about nine months since the Kansas City Chiefs won the Super Bowl. Many of us remember where we were, and how we celebrated. Some local couples celebrated in the bedroom.

KCTV5’S Ellen McNamara found out if a Chiefs baby boom is really underway!

It feels like a lifetime ago. A time when we could pack the Power and Light District and hug and kiss random people.

Catelyn and Michael Perez were in Miami for the Super Bowl.

It is easy to spot their house in Kansas City, MO because a Chiefs tailgate bus is out in front.

“We grew up going to games with our family,” Catelyn Perez said. “We've been together a little over 10 years. We got tickets ourselves.”

The season ticket holders got engaged on the field at Arrowhead Stadium and even named their dog Chief!

However, all of their dreams finally came true when the team won it all. In just a few days, the Perez’s will be holding their own trophy.

“We've always wanted a big family,” Catelyn Perez said. “We knew we would have one. Just a matter of when. We let that be up to whatever happens, and it just happened nine months after the Super Bowl!”

Dr. Marc Parrish with The University of Kansas Health System said he and others in the labor and delivery ward, anticipated an uptick in deliveries nine months following the Super Bowl.

Lauren Letterman with Welcome Baby KC is a doula. She supports women during and after birth.

“Almost double what we had been doing,” Letterman said. “So we’ve been really busy.”

Letterman says her client list grew because of the AFC Championship and Super Bowl win.

Rumors of Super Bowl babies reignite every year. The NFL even made a cute commercial about it.

McNamara asked quarterback Patrick Mahomes, who will become a first time dad in 2021, about the local baby boom.

“The baby boom, it's really cool to have this fan base and the passion that they show every single year in and year out,” Mahomes said. “And for them to be that excited about a Super Bowl, it really is a special feeling and hopefully I'm still around when those babies get a little older and they can grow up in the Chiefs Kingdom with me.”

While many are buzzing about the baby excitement, Dr. Parrish says the official birth numbers won't be known for a few weeks.

“Early December we should have all that information where we should be able to tell more,” Dr. Parrish said. “We still think that we will see an increase in the numbers.”

An unscientific way to find out if there really is a baby boom happening post Super Bowl is to check in with Rally House. The local store sells a lot of Chiefs baby gear. In fact, their sales are up 22% from this time last year.

“I'm hopeful that the Chiefs take this thing all the way again and win another Super Bowl, and then we have even more data to evaluate,” Dr. Parrish said.

The Perez’s already have plenty of Chiefs gear for their little girl. As for a name?

“We considered Kelce as a girl name, but we know a few other people who have that name, so we decided against it,” Catelyn said. “We've very excited. We just purchased our home a few months ago and we’re ready to expand the family and be parents.”

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